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Journal of Transportation and StatisticsVolume 4 Number 1

Journal of Transportation and Statistics - Volume 4, Number 1

Journal of Transportation and Statistics
Volume 4 Number 1

April 2001
ISSN 1094-8848

NOTES: The views presented in the articles in this journal are those of the authors and not necessarily the views of the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. All material contained in this journal is in the public domain and may be used and reprinted without special permission; citation as to sources is required.

The Journal of Transportation and Statistics has been discontinued by BTS because of budget constraints. Papers are therefore no longer being accepted or considered for publication. BTS hopes to bring the Journal back as a virtual publication in the future, and will post any news about the status of JTS on this page.

Table of Contents File Formats
Entire Report
Editorial Board
Contributors
Front Matter
Letter to the Editor
Paper 1 - Assessing the Impact of Speed-Limit Increases on Fatal Interstate Crashes by Sandy Balkin and J. Keith Ord
Table 1 - Significant Changes in Predicted Accident Rates Attributed to the Speed-Limit Increases on Rural Interstates
Table 2 - Significant Changes in Predicted Accident Rates Attributed to the Speed-Limit Increases on Urban Interstates
Table 3 - Predicted Number of Fatal Crashes Attributed to the Speed-Limit Increase on Rural Interstates
Table 4 - Predicted Number of Fatal Crashes Attributed to the Speed-Limit Increase on Urban Interstates
Figure 1 - Rural Arizona Crashes (Actual series and level component, Seasonal component, Irregular component)
Figure 2 - Aggregate Fatal Crashes: Rural, Urban, and All
Figure 3 - Significance Levels of Responses to the First Speed-Limit Change (1987) on Rural Interstates
Figure 4 - Significance Levels of Responses to the Second Speed-Limit Change (1996) on Rural Interstates
Figure 5 - Significance Levels of Responses to the Speed-Limit Change (1996) on Urban Interstates
Figure 6 - Significance Levels of Seasonal Components for Fatal Accidents on Rural Interstates
Figure 7 - Significance Levels of Seasonal Components for Fatal Accidents on Urban Interstates
Discussion: Johannes Ledolter
Discussion: Michael Fontaine, Tongbin Teresa Qu, Karl Zimmerman, and Clifford Spiegelman
Figure 1 - Injury Crashes per Month on Rural Interstate Highways in Texas, 1992-1999
Figure 2 - Injury Crashes per Month and Injury Crashes during Icy or Snowy Weather on Rural Interstate Highways in Texas, 1992-1999
Discussion: Andrew Harvey
Figure 1 - Series for Rural and Urban Arizona with Levels Estimated by a Bivariate Model
Rejoinder: Sandy Balkin and J. Keith Ord
Paper 2 - Accounting for Uncertainty in Estimates of Total Traffic Volume: An Empirical Bayes Approach by Gary Davis and Shimin Yang
Table 1 - Evaluation of 90% Prediction Intervals: First Factor Group
Table 2 - Evaluation of 90% Prediction Intervals: Second Factor Group
Table 3 - Evaluation of 90% Prediction Intervals: Third Factor Group
Paper 3 - Creating Land-Use Scenarios by Cluster Analysis for Regional Land-Use and Transportation Sketch Planning by Joshua Smith and Mitsuru Saito
Table 1 - GeoProcessing® Steps Used in Preparing Land-Use Data for Cluster Analysis
Table 2 - Input Parameters for 38 Trial Cluster Analyses on Land-Use Distress
Table 3 - Land-Use Distribution in Percent of the Clustered Land-Use Scenarios for 343 Wasatch Front Region Planning Districts
Sub Table 1
Sub Table 2
Sub Table 3
Sub Table 4
Figure 1 - Map of the Study Area and 343 Districts for the Largely Developable Areas of the Wasatch Front Region
Figure 2 - Land Use in the Wasatch Front Region
Figure 3 - Classification of Land-Use Scenarios for 343 Districts Using Single Linkage
Figure 4 - Final Classification of Land-Use Scenarios for 343 Districts Using Cluster Analysis
Paper 4 - Three Faces of Eve: How Engineers, Economists, and Planners Variously View Congestion Control, Demand Management, and Mobility Enhancement Strategies by Erik Ferguson
Table 1 - Performance Measures
Table 2 - Authors and Data
Table 3 - Semantic Scales
Table 4 - Regression Results
Table 5 - Variable Correlations
Table 6 - Outliers
Table A-1 Arnold Data
Table A-2 Downs Data
Table A-3 Zupan Data
Table B-1 Arnold Model
Table B-2 Downs Model
Table B-3 Zupan Model
Table C-1 Arnold Output
Table C-2 Downs Output
Table C-3 Zupan Output
Paper 5 - Loglinear Models and Goodness-of-Fit Statistics for Train Waybill Data by Herbert Lee and Kert Viele
Table 1 - Cross Validation Goodness-of-Fit Statistics for the Top Models
Paper 6 - Estimation and Evaluation of Full Marginal Costs of Highway Transportation in New Jersey by Kaan Ozbay, Bekir Bartin, and Joseph Berechman
Table 1 - Major Cost Categories and Data Sources
Table 2 - Results of Regression of Depreciation Cost
Table 3 - Operating Costs
Table 4 - Contribution Percentages of Operating Cost Categories
Table 5 - Accident Occurrence Rate Regression Analyses Results
Table 6 - Accident Costs by Type
Table 7 - Cost of Each Pollutant Type
Table 8 - Housing Value in New Jersey
Table 9 - Data Fitting for ORMC Values Given for Peak and Off-Peak Hours with Different VOT Values
Table 10 - Full Marginal Cost by Categories for a Trip Distance Range of 9 to 15 Miles
Table 11 - Fuel Prices and Percent Taxes in European Countries
Figure 1 - Hypothetical Marginal and Average Costs of Highway Transportation
Figure 2 - ORMC Calculation Process
Figure 3 - User Cost Categories
Figure 4 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Trip Distance for Peak and Off-Peak Hours (VOT = $7.6)
Figure 5 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Trip Distance for Peak and Off-Peak Hours (VOT = $32.3)
Figure 6 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Highway Functional Type Percentage During Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of Two Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Local-Collector Highway
Figure 7 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Highway Functional Type Percentage During Off-Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of Two Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Local-Collector Highway
Figure 8 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Highway Functional Type Percentage During Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of Two Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Minor Arterial Highway
Figure 9 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Highway Functional Type Percentage During Off-Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of Two Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Minor Arterial Highway
Figure 10 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Highway Functional Type Percentage During Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of Seven Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Principal Arterial
Figure 11 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Highway Functional Type Percentage During Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of 25 Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Interstate-Freeway-Expressway
Figure 12 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Highway Functional Type Percentage During Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of 25 Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Principal Arterial Highway
Figure 13 - ORMC Distribution with Respect to Degree of Urbanization During Peak Hours for a Trip Distance of 40 Miles (VOT = $7.6): Marginal Cost vs. Degree of Urbanization
Guidelines for Manuscript Submission
Back Cover
Updated: Saturday, May 20, 2017